Social facts certainly forecast alterations in PA (? = 0

Social facts certainly forecast alterations in PA (? = 0

09, ?? 2 = 5.96, df = 1, p < .05). The regression weights did not differ between activities with nearest and dearest and activities with family (?? 2 = 1.58, df = 1, p > .05). Predicting changes in life satisfaction from social activities with friends and with family members fixed to equal regression weights improved the model fit significantly if contrasted to a model, in which the association between levels of social activities and changes in life satisfaction were set to zero (?? 2 = 4.67, df = 1, p < .05). Releasing the equality constraint improved the model fit further (?friends = 0.14, ?family = 0.02, ?? 2 = 3.86, df = 1, p < .05), which indicates that only social activities with friends predicted changes in life satisfaction. In contrast, if social activities from both sources were fixed to predict changes in NA with equal strength, the increase in model fit was not significant (?? 2 = 0.01, df = 1, and p >.05). Estimating the regression weights freely resulted in a further significant increase in model fit (?? 2 = 5.48, df = 1, p < .05). Examining the regression weights, we found that the associations of social activities with friends and of social activities with family members nullified each other (?friends = ?0.08, ?family = 0.08, ?? 2 = 5.48, df = 1, p < .05). In this age group, activities with family at T1 were associated with increasing NA across time, whereas high levels of activity with friends at T1 were predictive of decreases in NA.

D iscussion

All the three hypotheses were just partly confirmed. Sure enough, the elderly involved with quicker casual social situations than just center-old adults. Typically, nonetheless they participate in a whole lot more relaxed activities making use of their group than simply using their family members. Continue reading “Social facts certainly forecast alterations in PA (? = 0”